| 
  • If you are citizen of an European Union member nation, you may not use this service unless you are at least 16 years old.

View
 

Pictures

Page history last edited by Béatrice H. Alves 9 years, 1 month ago

Pictures


 

Stating Own Idea about a Situation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Look at one of the pictures below.

 

1. Describe the picture in as much detail as possible.

2. How do you think this situation occurred?

TIPS TO DESCRIBE PICTURES

You should try to answer the following questions:

The picture/photo shows …

This is a picture of …

In this picture I can see …

This is an incident that happened …

Where was the picture taken? on the apron, on the runway, on the taxiway, in the air….

If on ground, the kind of airport (big, small,…) – To support your opinion, describe the surroundings (woods, beach,…), the signs and markings (CAT II….), the runway(s), the tower, the vehicles, the people…

If in the air, the phase of the flight (climbing, descending, en route…) – To support your opinion, describe the pitch, the flaps, the gear…

When was the picture taken? after an accident, while the problem was happening…

How is the weather?

What kind of aircraft is it? If you can’t name it/them, describe it/them (engines, body, wings, winglets, tail…., cargo, passenger………)

What part of the aircraft is shown on the picture?

What kind of damage (if any) do you see? (hole, dent, crack…) (severe, light…)

What is happening now? (the aircraft is trying to land…, a ground vehicle is about to cross the runway...)

What has (probably) happened? (They may have gone through a storm. The engine must have ingested a big bird, a vulture for instance.….)

Why, in your opinion, is it happening or did it happen? (due to a rapid decompression, because of a disruptive passenger, in order to recycle the gear…..)

 

How does it compare to other accidents, incidents… you remember? (It reminds me of the Air France accident…)

Consequences

What can or should be done about it?  (There shouldn’t be any landfill near the airports…)

What is likely to happen in the future?

Express your opinion (In my opinion,.... I believe.... I think...

 

 

 Back to top

Deicing

Back to top

 

Lost door

 

 

Back to top

 

Hole in the fuselage

More on this accident here.

 

 Back to top

 

One-Two-Go

 

 

See more, read more          Read even more about it

 

 Back to top

 

Varig

More on this accident in O Rastro da Bruxa p.285

 Back to top

 

OOps

 

 

Back to top

 

United tilts backwards

Oops! The body gear steering on this one partially collapsed during hydraulic tests, causing the plane to tilt backward onto its tail!

 

Back to top

 

 

Wingstrike

 

 

Back to top

 

 

 

Incursion

 

Back to top

 

 

KingAir

 

Back to top

 

 

Fishing?

 

Back to top

 

 

Turkish Airlines

 

 

Read about it here or here .  Or Read the conclusions "Dutch Safety Board cites 'convergence of circumstances' in 2009 THY 737 crash"

 

Back to top

 

 

OOps again

 

Back to top

 

 

 

Birds strike everywhere

 

Back to top

 

 

 

 

Back to top

 

 

 

 

Back to top

 

 

 

 

Back to top

 

 

 

 

Back to top

 

 

 

 

 

Back to top

 

 

 

 

Back to top

 

 

 

 

Back to top

 

 

 

 

Back to top

 

 

 

Tail strike

 

Back to top

 

 

B777

 

Back to top

 

 

A380 Tailstrike

 

Back to top

 

 

B777 Tail strike

This B777 made a big thing out of a Normal Take off! Tail Strike! Realy bad one! ater 40min Fule Dumping over the "Schwarzwald" it made a Emercany Landing on RWY14 with all the Firetruck`s etc.... The Flight MA9 to Kualalumpur got Canceld after 6h standing at the Gate E56 on the Dock Middfield.

 

Back to top

 

Tire burst

 

Back to top

 

Concorde

 

Back to top

 

 

Tailstrike in Sidney

Shock absorbers decompressed, tail on the ground (Photo: Tony Gosarevski):
Shock absorbers decompressed, tail on the ground (Photo: Tony  Gosarevski)

Shock absorbers decompressed, tail on the ground (Photo: Tony  Gosarevski)

Shock absorbers decompressed, tail on the ground (Photo: Tony  Gosarevski)

Read about it here

 

Back to top

 

Kai Tak

 

**Photo 3 of 3** Malaysian Airlines saying good bye to Kai Tak with a bang. You can see a small spark under the right engine as it hits the runway !!

 

Back to top

 

 

 

NCA

 

 

Back to top

 

 

B167 in the water

Seen about one hour after the accident, B-165 languishes forlornly in Kowloon Bay with emergency slides deployed and Emergency Services in attendance, having run off the end of Runway 13 during Tropical Storm "Ira".

 

Back to top

 

 

 

Tristar

 

Er.....no that's not how we do it. Wouldn't want to be in that Tristar!

Back to top

 

 

DHL

 

Back to top

 

 

A trail of smoke

About ten seconds after take off from runway 19R a lot of smoke and debris (the thrust reverser cowling lost pieces of fibre glass and insulation) comes out from engine #1. The 777 keeps on climbing and after what I heard on the scanner they didn't get any indications at first in cockpit, it was the tower that noticed them that they were trailing smoke. After a couple of minutes the pilot discovers problems with the engine and decides to return to Arlanda after dumping ~65 tons of fuel over the baltic sea.

 

Back to top

 

 

DHL

The aircraft was hit by a surface to air missile as it approached Baghdad International Airport. Seen as she skids to a stop after a landing on runway 33L with complete hydraulics failure. Apologies for the quality.

 

Back to top

 

 

 

Tire smoke

 

UPDATE: Here is the real story about this incident, About a day after this photo appeared on that "other" site, I received an e-mail from this flight's First Officer asking me if I had any other photos of this landing. I forwarded him a few other photos and asked him what happened that day. He informed me that when they took off (I think he said from Anchorage but I'm not sure) The tower gave them a call and said they saw pieces of rubber on the runway after they departed but that it was uncertain if it was the Singapore aircraft or any of the previous departures. The First officer went on to say that the crew was not sure if it was their aircraft or not but were prepared to deal with it if it was when they landed at LAX. Well, it turned out that it was their tire so as a precaution they had contacted the LAX Fire Department well in advance of landing which explains why the FD was hot on their trail as they rolled out at the airport. The F/O also said that they did use brakes and reverse thrusters but in the usual way. He mentioned that it was a very gusty day which it was and the combination of high wind, dust on the runway, and the tire smoke is what made this appear the way that it did. When I asked the F/O if it made the crew nervous in any way, he said "It was just another day at work for us" So that's the story in a nutshell but I must say it was a great shot to capture......Thanks to the F/O for giving us the scoop. 

Back to top

 

 

Short field landing

Performing at the RAAF Richmond Airshow , this Hickam based C-17 demonstrated an impressive short field landing , the plan was to land and reverse all the way up to the taxiway and turn off to end the display but the #3 suffered a compressor stall. Impressive to say the least !

 

Back to top

 

 

 

Jet Blue

 

The fate of these people laid in the hands of a very skilled pilot. Thank God for their safe return and that crew deserve special commendation for their heroism and bravery.

 

Back to top

 

 

 

Bagage container

Uhh, I think LAN is missing a baggage container.

Back to top

 

 

Mocking bird?

The Irony of it all....

Back to top

 

Colliding

Back to top

 

 

 

Missing a piece?

How would you feel if you look out your window and saw this?

 

Returned to the airport just after takeoff. Parts of the engine cover were later found.

Back to top

 

 

 

B767 in the snow

 

This picture was taken hours after the landing of the "Gimli Glider". After a hard landing and hitting the guard rail, the nose gear collapsed. This runway is an inactive runway. At the time of the landing, there was a go-cart race going on. They quickly cleared the runway when the B767 was on final approach! Photo by Grant Sesak.

 

Back to top

 

 

 

FedEx

 

The NTSB determined that this incident was caused by flight crew error.

 

Back to top

 

 

 

What's left of an A340-313X

 

This airplane crashed while landing on runway 24L at Pearson Airport on the evening of August 2, 2005. Luckily, everyone aboard made it out alive!

 

Back to top

 

 

 

Skidding off

 

This aircraft was flying from CLO (Cali) to SMR (Santa Marta) -flight P5 7330- And skidded off the runway during landing due to heavy rain.

 

 

Back to top

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brand new

An Airbus A340-600 due to be delivered to Etihad Airways jumped its chocks during an engine test at Toulouse on 15th November. The nose went up and through a blast fence. Five persons were injured.

 

Back to top

 

 

Crosswind and Hard Landing

 

After a lot of crossswind and a hard landing this ATR skid out of the runway when one of the tires rolls out of the main gear and rest with the engines and one part of the wing broken.

 

Back to top

 

 

Engine blew up

Engine blew up at LAX airport when I was taking a photo to the Air New Zealand's 747. The explosion was very strong in the engine number 1. [Canon 20D + Sigma 50-500]

 

Back to top

 

 

How did she get there?

 

No chocks. No brakes set. A lot of explaining to do!

 

Back to top

 

KLM in Barcelona

 

 

Seen a day after it skidded off the runway. The quality isn´t great, but you can see the back slides and the spoiler deployed. Also, notice the left landing gear detached from the fuselage. They were really lucky, as the acft. stopped within meters of a deep ditch. This shot was taken as we were lifting off from Rwy 25R.

 

Back to top

 

 

Dumping

 

Flight AF006 Paris CDG to New York JFK . Due a technical reason (AirBrake), the plane has to go back to Paris in order to get fixed. Before landing the plane is dumping its fuel and is being escorted by a Mirage 2000 from the Armee de l'Air.

 

De-icing

De-icing in progress

 

Back to top

 

VIP

Back to top

 

 

Dez acidentes que mudaram a aviação

 

 

Source: Aviation News

 

Voar em um avião é extremamente seguro. Mas como conseguir voar pode ser tão confiável? Em parte, por causa de acidentes que, após as investigações, provocaram uma melhoria crucial na segurança. Aqui estão oito acidentes e duas aterrissagens de emergência, cuja influência se faz sentir - para o bem - cada vez que alguém embarca num avião:

1956 - Grand Canyon, EUA - Voo 2 da TWA e voo 718 da United

Providência tomada: Melhoria do sistema de tráfego aéreo. Criação da FAA.


O Super Constellation da TWA e o DC-7 da United decolaram de Los Angeles com apenas 3 minutos de diferença, ambos para o leste. Noventa minutos depois, fora de contato com os controladores de voo em terra e ainda sem regras de voo visual, as duas aeronaves estavam, aparentemente, manobrando em separado para permitir aos seus passageiros a vista do Grand Canyon, quando as hélices da asa esquerda do DC-7 rasgaram a cauda do Super Constellation. Ambas as aeronaves caíram no desfiladeiro, matando todas as 128 pessoas a bordo dois aviões. O acidente estimulou um upgrade de 250 milhões de dólares no sistema de controle do tráfego aéreo (ATC) - muito dinheiro para aqueles dias. O investimento funcionou: não houve mais nenhuma colisão entre dois aviões nos Estados Unidos em 47 anos. O acidente desencadeou a criação em 1958 da FAA - Federal Aviation Agency (agora Administration) para supervisionar a segurança aérea.

1978 - Portland, EUA - Voo 173 da United Airlines

Providência tomada: renovados os procedimentos de trabalho em equipe no cockpit.

O DC-8 da United, realizando o voo 173, ao se aproximar de Portland, no Oregon, com 181 passageiros, passou a circular perto do aeroporto por uma hora, enquanto a tripulação tentava - em vão - resolver um problema com o trem de aterrissagem. Embora o alertardo pelo engenheiro de voo que o nível de combustível baixava rapidamente, o piloto - mais tarde descrito por um pesquisador como "um oficial arrogante" - esperou muito tempo para começar sua aproximação final. O DC-8 ficou sem combustível e caiu sobre um bairro residencial, matando 10 pessoas. Em resposta, a United renovou seus procedimentos de formação e treinamento da tripulação do cockpit, usando o novo conceito 'Cockpit Resource Management' (CRM). Abandonando o tradicional "o capitão é Deus" dentro da hierarquia do avião, o CRM enfatizou o trabalho em equipe e a comunicação entre a tripulação, e, desde então, se tornou o padrão da indústria.

1983 - Cincinnatti, EUA - Voo 797 da Air Canada

Providência tomada: implantação de sensores de fumaça e luzes no piso da aeronave.

Os primeiros sinais de problemas no DC-9 da Air Canada, que realizava o voo 797, voando a 33.000 pés de Dallas com destino a Toronto, no Canadá, foram os tufos de fumaça flutuando para fora do toalete. Logo, uma densa fumaça negra começou a encher a cabine e o avião iniciou uma descida de emergência. Mesmo incapaz de ver o painel de instrumentos por causa da fumaça, o piloto conseguiu pousar o avião em Cincinnati. Mas, logo depois de as portas e saídas de emergência serem abertas, a irrompeu um incêndio na cabine antes que todos pudessem sair. Das 46 pessoas a bordo, 23 morreram. A FAA, posteriormente determinou que todas as aeronaves fossem equipadas com detectores de fumaça e extintores de incêndio automáticos. Num prazo de de cinco anos, todos os aviões foram atualizados camadas bloqueadoras de fogo e iluminação no piso para facilitar as saída dos passageiros sob fumaça densa. Os aviões construídos depois de 1988 têm mais resistência às chamas em seus materiais interiores.

1985 - Dallas/Fort Worth, EUA - Voo 191 da Delta

Providência tomada: implantação de detectores de direção e velocidade dos ventos.

No voo 191 da Delta, um Lockheed L-1011, aproximou-se para pouso no Aeroporto Dallas/Fort Worth, com uma tempestade à espreita, perto da pista. Quando estava a 800 pés, relâmpagos eram presentes em torno do avião que encontrou uma repentina mudança no vento. Atingido por um forte vento lateral a aeronave perdeu 54 nós de velocidade em poucos segundos. Descendo rapidamente, o L-1011 colidiu contra o chão a uma milha da pista, caindo sobre uma rodovia, esmagando um veículo e matando o condutor. O avião, em seguida, virou à esquerda e bateu em dois enormes tanques de água do aeroporto. A bordo, 134 das 163 pessoas morreram. O acidente provocou uma investigação que durou sete anos, envolvendo a NASA e a FAA, o que levou diretamente para a implantação de radares de bordo detectores de ventos nstalaçãoo on-board progressistas detectores de direção e velocidade dos ventos, o que se tornou equipamento padrão em aviões comerciais em meados de 1990. Apenas um acidente com vento cruzado ocorreu desde então.

1986 - Los Angeles, EUA - Voo 498 da AeroMéxico

Providência tomada: Transponder e TCAS II em pequenos aviões.

Embora o sistema ATC, pós-acidente no Grand Canyon, tenha feito um bom trabalho de separação entre aviões, os pequenos aviões particulares não têm esse recurso, como o Piper Archer que vagueava na área de controle do Terminal de Los Angeles em 31 de agosto de 1986. Não detectado pelos controladores de solo, o pequeno avião entrou no no caminho de um DC-9 da Aeroméxico que se aproximava para aterrissar no Aeroporto Internacional de Los Angeles. O Piper colidiu contra o lado esquerdo do estabilizador horizontal do DC-9. Ambos os aviões caíram em um bairro residencial a 20 milhas a leste do aeroporto, matando 82 pessoas, incluindo 15 no solo. A FAA exigiu, subsequentemente, que as pequenas aeronaves passassem a utilizar transponders - dispositivos eletrônicos que dão posição e altitude para os controladores. Além disso, aviões foram obrigados a ter o equipamento anti-colisão TCAS II, que detecta potenciais colisões com outros aparelhos equipados com transponder e aconselham os pilotos a subir ou mergulhar como resposta ao alerta. Desde então, nenhum pequeno avião colidiu com um avião em voo nos Estados Unidos.

1988 - Maui, Havaí, EUA - Voo 243 da Aloha

Providência tomada: Melhoria na manutenção e inspeção das aeronaves antigas.

O voo 243 da Aloha, realizado por um cansado Boeing 737 já com 19 anos de uso, em uma pequena rota doméstica entre Hilo e Honolulu, no Havaí, estava nivelado a 24.000 pés quando uma grande parte de sua fuselagem explodiu e desprendeu-se da aeronave, deixando dezenas de passageiros voando ao ar livre. Milagrosamente, o resto da estrutura do avião suportou o tempo suficiente para os pilotos pousarem com segurança. Apenas uma pessoa, uma aeromoça que foi varrida para fora do avião, morreu. O National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) culpou uma combinação de corrosão e danos por fadiga generalizada, como resultado de repetidos ciclos de pressurização do avião durante 89.000 horas de voo. Em resposta, a FAA iniciou o Programa de Pesquisa 'National Aging Aircraft' em 1991, que reforçou a inspeção e as exigências de manutenção para o uso de aeronaves já com altos ciclos de uso. Pós-Aloha, houve apenas um acidente por fadiga na aviação norte-americana: o acidente com um DC-10 em Sioux City.

1994 - Pittsburgh, EUA - Voo 247 da USAir

Providência tomada: Raio X do leme.

Quando o voo 427 da USAir começou sua abordagem ao Aeroporto de Pittsburgh, o Boeing 737 de repente virou para a esquerda e mergulhou 5.000 pés em direção ao solo, matando todos os 132 ocupantes a bordo. A caixa-preta do avião revelou que o leme tinha abruptamente mudado para a posição a esquerda, provocando o giro e a queda. Mas, por quê? A USAir culpou o avião. A Boeing responsabilizou a tripulação. Demorou cerca de cinco anos para a NTSB concluir que uma falha numa válvula no sistema de controle do leme tinha causado a mudança de direção. Na sequência da falha, os pilotos freneticamente pressionaram o pedal direito do leme, e o leme foi à esquerda. Como resultado, a Boeing gastou US$ 500 milhões para equipar todos os 2.800 Boeing's em operação no mundo. E, em resposta aos conflitos entre a companhia e as famílias das vítimas, o Congresso aprovou o 'Family Assistance Act', que transferiu os serviços de atendimento aos desastres aéreo para a NTSB.

1996 - Miami, EUA - Voo 592 da ValuJet

Providência tomada: sistema de prevenção de incêndio no porão.

Embora a FAA tenha tomado medidas anti-incêndio para as cabines após o acidente de 1983 com um Air Canadá, ele não fez nada para proteger os compartimentos de passageiros e de carga dos aviões - apesar dos avisos da NTSB após uma carga de incêndio em 1988, em que um avião ainda conseguiu pousar com segurança. O incêndio no compartimento de carga levou ao horrível acidente no voo 592 da ValuJet, nos Everglades, perto de Miami. Após a tragédia, finalmente o organismo foi estimulado a agir. O fogo no DC-9 foi causado por geradores de oxigênio químico que haviam sido ilegalmente embalados pela SabreTech, empreiteira da companhia de manutenção. A colisão dos equipamentos e o calor resultante do impacto, iniciou um incêndio, que foi alimentado pelo oxigênio que estva sendo emitido. Os pilotos não puderam aterrissar o avião em chamas a tempo e 110 pessoas morreram. A FAA respondeu ordenando a instalação de detectores de fumaça e extintores automáticos de incêndio nos porões de todos os aviões comerciais. O órgão também reforçou as regras contra o transporte de carga perigosa a bordo de aeronaves.

1996 - Long Island, EUA - Voo 800 da TWA

Providência tomada: eliminação de faísca elétrica.

Foi pesadelo para todos: um avião explode no ar, sem razão aparente. A explosão do voo 800 da TWA, um Boeing 747 que acabara de decolar do aeroporto JFK com destino a Paris e matou todas as 230 pessoas a bordo, provocou grande controvérsia. Após a cuidadosa remontagem dos destroços, a NTSB descartou a possibilidade de um atentado terrorista ou de um ataque com mísseis e concluiu que os gases no tanque de combustível central haviam se inflamado, provavelmente depois de um curto-circuito no cabo do sensor de combustível provocou uma pequena faísca de 75mJ, fato que causou a detonação dos gases misturados a querosene. A FAA, desde então, exigiu mudanças para reduzir as faíscas de fiações defeituosas e em outras fontes. A Boeing, por sua vez, desenvolveu um sistema que injeta gás nitrogênio em tanques de combustível para reduzir a possibilidade de explosões. Todos os aviões construídos a partir de 2008 têm o dispositivo instalado. Kits para Boeing's fabricados anteriormente também foram disponibilizados.

1998 - Nova Escócia, Canadá - Voo 111 da Swissair

Providência tomada: substuição do isolamento anti-incêndio da fuselagem.

Cerca de uma hora após a decolagem, os pilotos do voo 111 da Swissair, que ia de Nova York para Genebra, na Suiça, a bordo de um McDonnell Douglas MD-11, sentiram um cheiro de fumaça no cockpit. Quatro minutos depois, eles começaram uma descida imediata para Halifax, em Nova Escócia, cerca de 65 quilômetros de distância. Porém, com a propagação do incêndio e as luzes do cockpit e os instrumentos falhando, o avião acabou caindo no Atlântico a cerca de 5 milhas da costa da Nova Escócia. Todas as 229 pessoas a bordo morreram. Os investigadores detectaram que o fogo no avião originou-se na rede de entretenimento do voo, cuja instalação levou à um curto-circuíto nos fios acima do cockpit. O incêndio se espalhou rapidamente ao longo do isolamento da fuselagem. A FAA ordenou que o isolamento fosse substituídos por materiais resistentes ao fogo em cerca de 700 jatos McDonnell Douglas.

 

 

Back to top

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comments (0)

You don't have permission to comment on this page.